cape town tour

Village to village hiking in Riversondend, South Africa

The three villages of Greyton, McGregor and Montagu form an almost perfect line across totally unspoilt nature reserves in the Western Cape, South Africa.  To this day, there isn't a better way to get from Greyton to McGregor other than along the beautiful Bosmanskloof hiking route over the Riversonderend Mountains.

Lady Grace, Greyton
Lady Grace, Greyton

We'd recommend staying at Lady Grace in Greyton: this cute cottage has a pretty courtyard garden filled with quirky objets trouves and a collection of four bijoux bedrooms decorated in soothing pastels. 

Wonderous and seemingly infinite valleys along the Bosmanskloof Trail

In total, it's 16km (although you can do an 'out and back' of 4km too from Greyton) and is punctuated by cool and deep mountain water rock pools. You can expect to see carcal, sunbirds, buzzards and baboons coupled with an almost total absence of humans. You can hike one way. Stuck for how to get back from McGregor? Don't worry, McGregor Tourism on 028 254 9414 can get you a taxi back. You will need a permit for this trail.

http://greytonconservationsociety.com/bosmanskloof-trail-greyton-mcgregor 

Deep rock pools and serine waterfalls punctuate the Bosmanskloof Hike
Greyton's Saturday Market - a living, breathing ev...
Walking through Waterford Wines

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Belleville, Cape Town
7450

Office +27 21 424 5347
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About

We’re an ethical private travel planning company focused on Southern Africa.

We offer ready-made and also customised holidays and journeys across this unique region of the world.

When our clients travel with us, they are assured that their travel spend is directly supporting local African companies that offer sustainable products and services, both in terms of people and planet.

Ethos

Our logo is an image of a skull found in the Rising Star Cave System in Gauteng, South Africa in 2013. It was named ‘homo naledi’, meaning ‘human of the stars’.

The cave system has so far given rise to the remains of over 15 individuals, making it the largest hominid fossil remains site ever discovered.

Travelling to Southern Africa is truly a return to the source of humankind, to Where It All Began.