cape town tour

South Africa's Gandhi legacy

It comes as a surprise to many visitors to South Africa to learn that Mahatma Gandhi who famously liberated India from colonial British rule began his resistance to racial oppression as a young lawyer in South Africa.  In fact, he lived in South Africa for no less than 21 years. This part of his life is alluded to in the Richard Attenborough film where Gandhi was famously thrown off a train for sitting in the First Class carriage (which he had paid for) during the apartheid era.

Much of the Gandhi legacy is to be found in the KwaZulu Natal province (more on that another time) but not many people know that Gandhi also lived for a time in Johannesburg at what is now called Satyagarha House.

This wonderful building is now both a guesthouse and a museum, so you can visit it and stay in it. Most interestingly, it was actually built for Gandhi by a German architect friend of his, who built it to resemble a traditional African farm house, replete with round 'rondavel' style rooms, thatched roofs and curved window panes.

It's in a great part of the northern section of the city, near to Melrose, Constitution Hill and the green lungs of the James and Ethel Gray Park and the Houghton Golf Club.

Rates start at R3 000 (US$175) per room per night.

The San community of the Kalahari
Living on the edge - ethically!

Contact Us

26 Brunswick Road
Tamboerskloof, Cape Town

Office +27 21 424 5347
Cell +27 72 136 9096

WhatsApp +27 72 136 9096

Email: travel@whereitallbegan.co.za

Skype: philrendel

About

We’re an ethical private travel planning company focused on Southern Africa.

We offer ready-made and also customised holidays and journeys across this unique region of the world.

When our clients travel with us, they are assured that their travel spend is directly supporting local African companies that offer sustainable products and services, both in terms of people and planet.

Ethos

Our logo is an image of a skull found in the Rising Star Cave System in Gauteng, South Africa in 2013. It was named ‘homo naledi’, meaning ‘human of the stars’.

The cave system has so far given rise to the remains of over 15 individuals, making it the largest hominid fossil remains site ever discovered.

Travelling to Southern Africa is truly a return to the source of humankind, to Where It All Began.